Logic and Theism: Arguments for and against Beliefs in God by Jordan Howard Sobel

By Jordan Howard Sobel

This publication comprises arguments for and opposed to trust in God.

The arguments for the assumption are analyzed within the first six chapters and contain ontological arguments from Anselm via Gödel; the cosmological arguments of Aquinas and Leibniz; and arguments from proof for layout and miracles. the following chapters reflect on arguments opposed to trust. The final bankruptcy examines Pascalian arguments for and opposed to trust in God.

This ebook is a precious source for philosophers of faith and theologians and pursuits logicians and mathematicians to boot.

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Logic and Theism: Arguments for and against Beliefs in God

This e-book comprises arguments for and opposed to trust in God.

The arguments for the idea are analyzed within the first six chapters and contain ontological arguments from Anselm via Gödel; the cosmological arguments of Aquinas and Leibniz; and arguments from facts for layout and miracles. the subsequent chapters give some thought to arguments opposed to trust. The final bankruptcy examines Pascalian arguments for and opposed to trust in God.

This publication is a helpful source for philosophers of faith and theologians and pursuits logicians and mathematicians to boot.

The Old Master: A Syncretic Reading of the Laozi from the Mawangdui Text A Onward (SUNY series in Chinese Philosophy and Culture)

A different translation of and statement at the Laozi, in response to the oldest version of the work.

This specified, hugely contextualized translation of the Laozi is predicated at the earliest recognized variation of the paintings, textual content A of the Mawangdui Laozi, written ahead of 202 BCE. No different variations are such as this article in its antiquity. Hongkyung Kim additionally accommodates the new archaeological discovery of Laozi-related records disentombed in 1993 in Guodian, seeing those files as proto-materials for compilation of the Laozi and revealing clues for disentangling the paintings from advanced exegetical contentions. Kim makes vast use of chinese language commentaries at the Laozi and in addition examines the vintage chinese language texts heavily linked to the formation of the paintings to light up the highbrow and historic context of Laozi’s philosophy.

Kim bargains numerous unique and thought-provoking arguments at the Laozi, together with that the paintings was once compiled in the course of the Qin, which has typically been seen as commonplace of Legalist states, and that the Laozi will be famous as a syncretic textual content prior to being classified a Daoist one.

Hongkyung Kim is affiliate Professor of East Asian concept and Religions at Stony Brook college, kingdom collage of recent York.

Extra resources for Logic and Theism: Arguments for and against Beliefs in God

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I say that it is only God’s being essentially perfectly good that can have these consequences; that it has this consequence only if it includes not only essentially having a good character, but of being essentially one who never acts out of character; and that what is made implausible is not the theistic picture of God, but only a theistic picture of God. It is the picture of a being not merely perfect in every way, but of a being essentially perfect in every way, that philosophers have conjured not for the spiritual purposes of those who would be faithful, but for their own (dubious) philosophic purposes.

We are led . . to [the] demand that our religious object should have an unsurpassable supremacy . . that it should tower infinitely above all other objects” (Ibid). Divinity 12 We are led, Findlay is saying, to the god of the philosophers, to Rene´ Descartes’s perfect being, to St. Anselm’s that than which nothing greater can be conceived, to a being superior not only to us, but to everything that is and that might be. We are led to this idea of the Supreme Being. Having formed the idea of such greatness, it can seem that it would be proper to bend before, and to worship, nothing less – that it is either this God of the philosophers or no god at all.

Swinburne’s paragon of godliness would be “truly ultimate, itself without explanation of any kind, that which explains all other things” (Swinburne 1993, p. 301). His necessary god would simply be, without necessity and without explanation of any kind. Swinburne does not think that that detracts in the least from his necessary god’s worthiness for worship. The point Geach attributes to Price, a point with which I am sympathetic, is in part that similarly Swinburne’s contingent god’s being merely, that is, nonessentially, perfect does not detract from its worthiness for worship.

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