Dante's Paradiso: The Vision of Paradise from The Divine by Dante Alighieri

By Dante Alighieri

Paradiso is the 3rd and ultimate a part of Italian poet Dante Alighieri's epic poem Divine Comedy and describes Dante's trip via heaven. he's now led through Beatrice, who joined him on the finish of Purgatorio.

Beatrice takes Dante into the 9 celestial spheres of Heaven. From the 1st Sphere, the place they locate those that have been sturdy yet didn't hold their vows, to the 9th Sphere and the Empyrean, the house of the angels and God, Dante reviews the advantages given to those that dwell a lifestyles devoted to God. Dante wrote his narrative poem among 1308 and 1321.

This model is taken from a 1901 English variation, that includes British writer Rev. H. F. Cary's clean verse translation and woodcut illustrations by way of French artist Gustave Doré.

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Additional info for Dante's Paradiso: The Vision of Paradise from The Divine Comedy

Example text

Feltro too Shall sorrow for its godless shepherd’s fault, Of so deep stain, that never, for the like, Was Malta’s bar unclos’d. Too large should be The skillet, that would hold Ferrara’s blood, And wearied he, who ounce by ounce would weight it, 43 The which this priest, in show of party-zeal, Courteous will give; nor will the gift ill suit The country’s custom. ” She ended, and appear’d on other thoughts Intent, re-ent’ring on the wheel she late Had left. That other joyance meanwhile wax’d A thing to marvel at, in splendour glowing, Like choicest ruby stricken by the sun, For, in that upper clime, effulgence comes Of gladness, as here laughter: and below, As the mind saddens, murkier grows the shade.

My liege, it doth enhance the joy thy words Infuse into me, mighty as it is, To think my gladness manifest to thee, As to myself, who own it, when thou lookst Into the source and limit of all good, There, where thou markest that which thou dost speak, Thence priz’d of me the more. Glad thou hast made me. ” I thus inquiring; he forthwith replied: “If I have power to show one truth, soon that 39 Shall face thee, which thy questioning declares Behind thee now conceal’d. The Good, that guides And blessed makes this realm, which thou dost mount, Ordains its providence to be the virtue In these great bodies: nor th’ all perfect Mind Upholds their nature merely, but in them Their energy to save: for nought, that lies Within the range of that unerring bow, But is as level with the destin’d aim, As ever mark to arrow’s point oppos’d.

Man in himself had ever lack’d the means Of satisfaction, for he could not stoop Obeying, in humility so low, As high he, disobeying, thought to soar: And for this reason he had vainly tried Out of his own sufficiency to pay The rigid satisfaction. Then behooved That God should by his own ways lead him back Unto the life, from whence he fell, restor’d: By both his ways, I mean, or one alone. But since the deed is ever priz’d the more, The more the doer’s good intent appears, Goodness celestial, whose broad signature Is on the universe, of all its ways To raise ye up, was fain to leave out none, Nor aught so vast or so magnificent, Either for him who gave or who receiv’d Between the last night and the primal day, Was or can be.

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